Which is worse: calling someone a name or poisoning them?

It’s name-calling, according to High Court Judge Roger ter Haar QC.

Teacher Shaaira Alexis was poisoned with whiteboard cleaning fluid by one of her pupils, named only as Faye, after the teacher called her a ‘white prostitute’ for putting make-up on in class.

Miss Alexis’s claim for £700,000 is clearly ludicrous and she does look very scary in the photo in the Mail, but you know what her mistake was that prevented her from getting due sympathy for her poisoning, which needed hospital treatment?

Yes, she mentioned a colour, in this case, “white”.

Now I know that ‘racism cuts both ways’, but come on. The woman was brought here from the West Indies because there is a shortage of home-grown teachers, which is bizarre in a country where a large proportion of school-leavers go on to University. She would undoubtedly have been used to seeing better behaved youngsters in Grenada, so it’s not surprising if she snapped at a girl who wasn’t paying attention and who is admittedly “an academic under-achiever”.

I’m not trying to justify ‘racism’ especially in its real sense, but it reminds me of Ron Atkinson’s slip a few year’s back when he thought the microphones were off and he referred to Chelsea player Marcel Desailly as an effing lazy, thick nigger.

Not a pleasant thing to say, but did Atkinson deserve to lose his career because of it? No! When you consider how much he did for black players in the game it is an emphatic ‘No’!

You just have to watch every syllable you utter these days, especially when angry – unless you’re a lout screaming obscenities, of course. Then you’re a delicate flower who shouldn’t be upset by being told to button it (dissed) and your parents will insist you never do anything wrong – if they can drag themselves away from the telly long enough to add their opinions to yours.

I see that Dave Cameron has apparently threatened Teutono-British relations by doing an impression of a Nazi asking ‘Where are your papers?’ when discussing ID cards, but the Daily Mail reports that ‘it drew gasps from listening voters at the question and answer session in Norwich, and did not quite yield the response he was going for’.

‘Critics fear it could even trigger an embarrassing diplomatic row between the would-be Prime Minister and Germany.’

Actually, I’m almost sure that the Germans must have a better sense of humour than us these days.

About twenty years ago I watched “The Germans” episode of Fawlty Towers with a real German! He couldn’t stop laughing and I couldn’t stop laughing because he couldn’t stop laughing. It was one of the funniest half hours of my entire life.

Basil has probably done more for international relations than politicians have. Well, except when it comes to Americans. He doesn’t like them or their Waldorf salads!

Presumably Mr Carnegie, the health inspector who checked Fawlty Towers, would have considered the deliberate poisoning of a guest to be far worse than insulting them. If Basil had poisoned as many people as he’d insulted, Torquay would have been a ghost town.

I don’t know what punishment ‘Faye’ got for deliberately poisoning her teacher. It seemed to be rendered unimportant. It shows how far we have come through the brainwashing cycle when a headline like:

“Racist teacher sues school” would be considered more appropriate than:

“Schoolgirl poisons her teacher”.

Like I said, I’m not into racist talk, but this sort of nonsense surely encourages disharmony when we could try and make amends; forgive and forget. Sticks and stones and all that.

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2 Responses to Which is worse: calling someone a name or poisoning them?

  1. Andrew F says:

    “I’m not trying to justify ‘racism’ especially in its real sense, but it reminds me of Ron Atkinson’s slip a few year’s back when he thought the microphones were off and he referred to Chelsea player Marcel Desailly as an effing lazy, thick nigger.

    Not a pleasant thing to say, but did Atkinson deserve to lose his career because of it? No! When you consider how much he did for black players in the game it is an emphatic ‘No’!”

    You’re not trying to justify racism, but you think a broadcaster should be allowed to call someone a nigger on national televison and keep their career. Anyone who uses the word “nigger” in derogatory context is a racist. They’re saying that beiing black is a mark of inferiority.

    I bet you’d have had a different opinion if he’d called, say, Kaka a lazy, idiotic member of the God-squad – which of course is perfectly justified since someone’s religious beliefs are indicative of how they use their intellectual faculties.

    You are a ****** scary man sometimes, Stewart.

  2. Stewart Cowan says:

    “you think a broadcaster should be allowed to call someone a nigger on national televison and keep their career.”

    You’ve not begun to understand what I’m saying.

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